Definition of Poor Hygiene: Symptoms, Signs, Causes & Treatment

Every day, you come into contact with millions of outside germs and viruses. They can linger on your body, and in some cases, they may make you sick.

Learn more about why hygiene is so important, the best ways to practice it, and how you can change your habits to make yourself feel and look better.

Poor hygiene can be a sign of self-neglect, which is the inability or unwillingness to attend to one’s personal needs. Poor hygiene often accompanies certain mental or emotional disorders, including severe depression and psychotic disorders.

Dementia is another common cause of poor hygiene. Other people may develop poor hygiene habits due to social factors such as poverty or inadequacy of social support.

Physical disabilities can also interfere with one’s ability to care for oneself and may result in an individual being unable to attend to personal hygiene.

There is no treatment for poor hygiene, although antipsychotic and antidepressant medications are used when certain mental illnesses are the cause of this behavior.

Other causes of poor hygiene

  • Brain Trauma
  • Delusional Disorder
  • Drug-Induced Psychosis
  • Lack of Social Support
  • Physical Disability
  • Poverty
  • Vascular Dementia

Causes of Poor Hygiene

Alcohol and Teens

Alcohol is the most frequently used drug by American teenagers. Teens that drink are more likely to drive under the influence, have unprotected sex, and use other drugs, like marijuana, cocaine, and heroin.

Symptoms of alcohol abuse in teens include lying, breaking curfew, becoming verbally or physically abusive toward others, making excuses, smelling like alcohol, having mood swings, and stealing.

Alcoholism

Alcoholism is a disease that includes alcohol craving and continued drinking despite repeated alcohol-related problems, such as losing a job or getting into trouble with the law.

It can cause myriad health problems, including cirrhosis of the liver, birth defects, heart disease, stroke, psychological problems, and dementia. Counseling and a few medications can be effective for alcoholism treatment.

Alzheimer’s Disease

Alzheimer’s disease is a common cause of dementia. Symptoms and warning signs of Alzheimer’s disease include memory loss, difficulty performing familiar tasks, disorientation to time and place, misplacing things, and more.

The biggest risk factor for Alzheimer’s disease is increased age. Treatment for Alzheimer’s is often targeted toward decreasing the symptoms and progression of the disease.

Bipolar Disorder

Bipolar disorder (or manic depression) is a mental illness characterized by depression, mania, and severe mood swings. Treatment may incorporate mood-stabilizer medications, antidepressants, and psychotherapy.

Brain and Spinal Cord Tumors in Adults (Symptoms, Signs, Causes, Treatment Options, Life Expectancy)

Brain and spinal tumor are diseases in which cancer (malignant) cells begin to grow in the tissues of the brain. Tumors that start in the brain are called primary brain tumors. Tumors that start in the brain and spread to other organs are called primary brain tumors.

Symptoms may include headaches, personality changes, dizziness, and trouble walking. Treatment depends upon the type and grade of tumor.

Brain Damage: Symptoms, Causes, Treatment

Brain damage causes destruction or deterioration of brain cells. Traumatic brain injury (TBI) and acquired brain injury (ABI) are two kinds of brain damage. Symptoms may include headaches, confusion, memory problems, nausea, and more.

Treatment includes patient stabilization and ensuring that blood and oxygen are flowing to the brain. Adequate blood pressure control is also necessary. In cases of severe brain damage, surgery and rehabilitation may be required.

Brain Tumor (Symptoms, Signs, Types, Causes, Survival Rates)

A brain tumor can be either non-cancerous (benign) or cancerous (malignant), primary, or secondary. Common symptoms of a primary brain tumor are headaches, seizures, memory problems, personality changes, and nausea and vomiting.

Causes and risk factors include age, gender, family history, and exposure to chemicals. Treatment is depends upon the tumor type, grade, and location.

Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease

Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) is a rare, degenerative, invariably fatal brain disorder. CJD generally appears in the later years and runs a rapid course.

Symptoms of CJD include failing memory, lack of coordination, visual disturbances, failing memory, blindness, weakness, and eventually coma. There are three major categories of CJD; 1) sporadic CJD, 2) hereditary CJD, and 3) acquired CJD. There is no cure for Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease.

Dementia

Dementia is defined as a significant loss of intellectual abilities such as memory capacity, severe enough to interfere with social or occupational functioning. There are several different types of dementia, including cortical, subcortical, progressive, primary, and secondary dementias.

Other conditions and medication reactions can also cause dementia. Dementia is diagnosed based on a certain set of criteria. Treatment for dementia is generally focused on the symptoms of the disease.

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Drug Abuse

Drug addiction is a chronic disease that causes drug-seeking behavior and drug use despite negative consequences to the user and those around him.

Though the initial decision to use drugs is voluntary, changes in the brain caused by repeated drug abuse can affect a person’s self-control and ability to make the right decisions and increase the urge to take drugs. Drug abuse and addiction are preventable.

Huntington’s Disease

Huntington’s disease is the result of degeneration of neurons in areas of the brain. Huntington’s disease is an inherited disorder. Early symptoms include mood swings, apathy, depression, and anger uncharacteristic of the individual.

Judgement, memory, and other cognitive functions may become impaired. Presymptomatic testing is available for individuals who have a family history of Huntington’s disease. Treatment includes medication and therapy for symptoms.

Lewy Body Dementia (Dementia with Lewy Bodies)

Lewy body dementia (LBD or dementia with Lewy bodies) is one the most common causes of dementia. There are two types of LBD: 1) dementia with Lewy bodies, and 2) Parkinson’s disease dementia.

Symptoms of LBD are changes in a person’s ability to think, movement problems, and sleep disorders. Treatment of LBD includes lifestyle changes, management of symptoms, palliative care, and medications to manage symptoms.

Parkinson’s Disease

Parkinson’s disease is a slowly progressive neurological disease characterized by a fixed inexpressive face, a tremor at rest, slowing of voluntary movements, a gait with short accelerating steps, peculiar posture and muscle weakness, caused by degeneration of an area of the brain called the basal ganglia, and by low production of the neurotransmitter dopamine. Most patients are over 50, but at least 10 percent are under 40.

Postpartum Depression

Postpartum depression is a form of depression that occurs within a year after delivery. It is thought that rapid hormone changes after childbirth may lead to depression.

Symptoms of postpartum depression include crying a lot, headaches, chest pains, eating too little or too much, sleeping too little or too much, withdrawal from friends and family, and feeling irritable, sad, hopeless, worthless, guilty, and overwhelmed. Treatment typically involves talk therapy and medication.

Psychotic Disorders

Psychotic disorders are a group of serious illnesses that affect the mind. Different types of psychotic disorders include schizophrenia, schizoaffective disorder, schizophreniform disorder, brief psychotic disorder, shared psychotic disorder, delusional disorder, substance-induced psychotic disorder, paraphrenia, and psychotic disorders due to medical conditions.

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Schizoaffective Disorder

Schizoaffective disorder is a mental illness that features schizophrenia and a mood disorder, either major depression or bipolar disorder.

Symptoms include agitation, suicidal thoughts, little need for sleep, delusions, hallucinations, and poor motivation. Treatment may involve psychotherapy, medication, skills training, or hospitalization.

Schizophrenia

Schizophrenia is a disabling brain disorder that may cause hallucinations and delusions and affect a person’s ability to communicate and pay attention. Symptoms of psychosis appear in men in their late teens and early 20s and in women in their mid-20s to early 30s.

With treatment involving the use of antipsychotic medications and psychosocial treatment, schizophrenia patients can lead rewarding and meaningful lives.

Schizotypal Personality Disorder

Schizotypal personality disorder is characterized by odd behaviors, feelings, perceptions, and ways of relating to others that interfere with one’s ability to function. Medication and psychotherapy can help the sufferer to manage their symptoms.

Stroke

A stroke is an interruption of the blood supply to part of the brain caused by either a blood clot (ischemic) or bleeding (hemorrhagic). Symptoms of a stroke may include: weakness, numbness, double vision or vision loss, confusion, vertigo, difficulty speaking or understanding speech.

A physical exam, imaging tests, neurological exam, and blood tests may be used to diagnose a stroke. Treatment may include administration of clot-busting drugs, supportive care, and in some instances, neurosurgery.

The risk of stroke can be reduced by controlling high blood pressure, high cholesterol, diabetes, and stopping smoking.

Reference

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